Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice

The Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice degree is a 120-credit program which offers a comprehensive and practical study of the American criminal justice system and the professional roles that accompany it. Students gain in-depth and relevant understanding of the tools, processes, legal issues, and challenges inherent in careers in law enforcement, corrections and private security. Specializations include forensic investigation, corrections and leadership/management of criminal justice organizations. A capstone course designed to be the culminating learning experience tests critical thinking and analytic skills of every student.

Program Requirements
  • General Education - 42 credits
  • Program Core - 45 credits
  • Criminal Justice Electives - 33 Credits

Or

  • Concentration Courses - 18 credits
  • Criminal Justice Electives - 15 credits

Concentrations

  • Forensic Investigation
  • Corrections
  • Leadership/Management
Upon completion of the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice program, students will be able to:
  1. Recommend policies and practices to address issues confronting contemporary criminal justice systems.
  2. Assess contemporary correctional policies and practices from differing criminal justice perspectives.
  3. Connect biological, sociological and psychological theories of criminality and evaluations of individual behaviors to problems of contemporary criminal justice practice.
  4. Use legal and regulatory standards to assess policies and procedures and to select courses of action in the practice of criminal justice.
  5. Analyze polices, procedures and practices that affect law enforcement agencies and professional practice.
  6. Apply scientific methods of inquiry and analysis to arrive at reasoned decisions regarding professional practice.

A Note About General Education Core Courses

All course selections in the bachelor's degree program should be made in consultation with an academic advisor to assure program requirements and prerequisites for completing your bachelor's of science degree are met.

Placement testing is required of all incoming undergraduate students in the subject area of English Composition unless specific transfer credit has been successfully completed in this specific discipline of study. Some students may need to take a fundamental writing course (WRT 100) before taking WRT 101. This fundamental course cannot count towards Ellis University's bachelor's degree core requirements.

Placement testing is required of all incoming undergraduate students in the subject area of Mathematics unless specific transfer credit has been successfully completed in this specific discipline of study. Some students may need to take fundamental math courses (MAT 096, MAT 100) before taking MATH 125 or higher. These fundamental courses cannot count towards Ellis University's bachelor's degree core requirements.

To fulfill the Liberal Arts credit requirement, undergraduate students may choose a course from the following areas: Behavioral Science, English, Humanities, Life Science, Mathematics, Physical Science or Social Science. Please note that certain CRJ courses may not be used.

Students may use their military or veteran's benefits toward their tuition costs for this degree.

Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice - Program Outline

Core Courses

English Composition Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • WRT 101 College Composition I 3

    • Instruction in the application of the principles and skills involved in effective expository writing, with most readings from nonfiction prose. Introduces students to the writing process with special attention to constructing arguments, working with sources, and crafting effective sentences and paragraphs.
  • WRT 151 College Composition II 3

    • Further development of the expository and writing and reading skills taught in English. An introduction to literature and the development of library skills leading to a documented research paper. Prerequisite: WRT 101.

English Courses (Choose 6 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • COM 240 Writing for the Mass Media 3

    • This practical introductory course exposes students to the basics of effective writing and the variety of writing challenges posed by the mass media. Simple forms of writing for various media are explored as are elements of good writing such as internal conflict, word economy, objectivity, subjectivity, and the use of nonverbal messages. Prerequisites: WRT 101 and WRT 151.
  • LIT 220 The Art of Drama 3

    • An intermediate-level course in which the student explores dramatic literature in an effort to discover its ritual origins, historical role and current significance. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 210 The Art of Poetry 3

    • An intermediate-level course in which the student learns the technique of reading, interpreting, and evaluating poetry of increasing difficulty and brilliance. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 230 The Art of Fiction 3

    • An intermediate-level course in which selected works of fiction are examined in an effort to understand the approaches, strategies and techniques of artists in this compelling medium. Students will also produce an original, creative piece. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 240 The Art of Prose: Scientific and Technical Literature 3

    • An intermediate-level course in which the art of prose writing is explored in depth. This course focuses on stylistics and rhetoric and covers the development of scientific and technical literature. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 310 Modern Poetry 3

    • This course is more an in depth study than an introduction to representative British and American poets of the 20th century. Emphasis is placed on the manner in which modern poetry derives from traditional patterns yet manages to create new forms and messages for our time.
      Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 330 Survey of World Literature 3

    • Study of outstanding writers from all over the world except England and America, from ancient times to the 20th century. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 331 Art of the Novel 3

    • An advanced study of selected masterpieces in the novel form.
  • LIT 340 The African-American Writer in American Literature 3

    • Reading and discussion of representative works of African-American writers. Historical and social backgrounds are explored to interpret African-American literature as meaningful as part of the American literary tradition. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • LIT 341 Twentieth-Century American Literature 3

    • An advanced study of major American literature of the 20th century. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • WRT 310 Business Writing 3

    • An intermediate-level writing course for students in business. Instruction and practice in all phases of business communications. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • WRT 316 Writing for the Technical Professions 3

    • An intermediate-level writing course for students of the physical and life sciences and technology. Emphasis on style in technical writing, modes of technical discourse (definition, description, analysis, interpretation) and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing, technical reports and oral presentations. Methods and procedures of research are explored in depth. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • WRT 330 Writing for Communication Arts 3

    • An intermediate-level writing course for students in the communication field with emphasis on developing writing fluency. Focus on expository, persuasive writing; in-depth study of research methods; and strategies for effective business communication, including resume writing and oral presentations. Prerequisite: WRT 151.
  • WRT 335 Writing for Publication 3

    • An advanced writing course with special emphasis on published work. Students interested in writing and those seriously committed to their own writing improvement and to the writing of prose articles, fiction or poetry are especially encouraged to take this course. Prerequisite: WRT 151.

Speech Courses (Choose 3 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • COM 101 Communication: Principles and Process 3

    • This survey course introduces the nature, principles, elements and mechanism of the communication process. How, why, in what forms, and through what stages communication occurs is explored along with the nature of human perception and the role of verbal and nonverbal language in conveying meaning. Emphasis is placed on providing a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of communication as they apply to the design and delivery of the message via such media as print, radio, television, film and the Internet.
  • SPH 105 Basic Speech Communication 3

    • Study of the fundamentals of verbal communication including public speaking, interpersonal communication and small group interaction. Training in methods of obtaining and organizing materials and ideas for effective verbal communication.

Humanities Courses (Choose 6 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • HIS 110 American History I 3

    • This is a survey course of American history from the colonial period, the Revolution to the establishment of the Republic, the first half of the nineteenth century, up through the period of the Civil War, ending in 1865. The impact of geography on the growth of the Republic is considered. The political, economic and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.
  • HIS 150 American History II 3

    • This is a survey course of American history from the end of the Civil War to the present: the period of the Reconstruction, the industrialization of the United States, the emergence of the country as a great power, U.S. role in the 20th century are considered. The political, economic and cultural evolution of the American people is examined, providing the student with historical foundations for an informed political awareness of present-day issues.
  • HIS 210 The Contemporary World 3

    • This is a survey course of 20th century global history: it covers the period of imperialism leading to World War I, the emergence of the USSR as a major power, the transformation of Europe as a result of World War II, the period of the Cold War, the role of the USA in the post-cold war world. Special emphasis is placed on the impact of geography, science and technology on political, economic and cultural development of the world.
  • PHI 220 Ethics and Social Philosophy 3

    • An examination of some of the most critical issues of moral and social philosophy. These include subjects such as the linguistic analysis of terms such as “good,” “evil,” “duty,” “right” and others. The basis of different moral systems will be studied and the selections from ethical and social philosophers will be read.
  • PHI 230 Technology, Society, and Values 3

    • An examination of models and case studies concerned with the impact of machines on man, of technological systems on social structure, and modes of production on value systems. Special attention is paid to the ethical problems connected with newly emerging technologies.
  • PLS 110 American Government and Politics 3

    • This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government, the nature and structure of US government, its chief characteristics and functions. Special attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each other, expanding the students’ awareness of the effects of governmental decision on the American People.
  • PHI 110 Problems of Philosophy 3

    • An introduction to philosophy by way of selected problems from various areas of philosophy. Topics include: the nature of a priori knowledge and of scientific explanation, the existence of God, whether or not there can be moral knowledge, and the problem of free will. The course objective is to acquaint students with these philosophical issues, and through detailed discussion, to teach them how to analyze ideas critically.

Behavioral Science Courses (Choose 3 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3

    • An introduction to the contemporary American criminal justice system. Discussion of the role of police, courts and prisons. Also examined is the juvenile justice system. General issues considered include: police discretion, due process, and change as an integral element of the
      American criminal justice system.
  • CRJ 386 Police Psychology 3

    • The focus of the course will be on the personality, character, behavioral changes and social isolation that result from the inherent high levels of stress and trauma associated with police work (from entry level to retirement). Factors such as managerial planning, supervision, specialized assignments, high hazard work, tour changes, work environments, alcoholism, substance abuse, other addictive behavior patterns, suicide, and codependent family issues will be identified and addressed. Prerequisites: CRJ 110, PSY 110.
  • PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology 3

    • An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, maladjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society.
  • SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology 3

    • An analysis of the social and cultural forces that govern human behavior. The principal topics include: social interaction and organization, socialization processes, primary groups and the family (associations, bureaucracy and other social institutions), collective behavior, population and ecology.

Economics Courses (Choose 3 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • ECO 105 Principles of Economics I 3

    • A study of basic economic concepts emphasizing analysis of the aggregate economy. The fundamental concepts of national income and its determination, economic fluctuations, monetary and fiscal policies, and economic growth are covered.
  • ECO 110 Principles of Economics II 3

    • An examination of processes of price determination, output, and resource allocation in perfect and in imperfect competition. Also covers labor economics, international trade and finance, and alternative economic systems. Prerequisite: ECO 105.

Criminal Justice Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • CRJ 110 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3

    • An introduction to the contemporary American criminal justice system. Discussion of the role of police, courts and prisons. Also examined is the juvenile justice system. General issues considered include: police discretion, due process, and change as an integral element of the
      American criminal justice system.
  • CRJ 210 Organization and Administration of Criminal Justice 3

    • An introduction to the organization and structure of a police department. Topics include an overview of the police departments and analysis of the police function, tables of organization, chains of command and lines of authority, division of labor, and the informal police organization. Attention centers on typical problems of police administration and the coordination of police services.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 220 Ethics, Diversity and Professionalism 3

    • This course is designed to familiarize students with concepts relating to cultural diversity and the ethics/morality of criminal justice practitioners in the U.S. It identifies specific issues that are recurrent and problematic and suggests possible solutions for practitioners.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 230 Rules of Evidence 3

    • An explanation and analysis of the rules of evidence. The course treats recent U.S. Supreme Court decisions concerning the rights of the citizen against unreasonable search and seizure, and the rules of giving testimony and the protecting and safeguarding of evidence.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 240 Corrections 3

    • This course provides an overview of corrections component of the criminal justice system. The student will be introduced to institutional and community-based aspects of corrections. Underlying theoretical and philosophical underpinnings will be discussed as well as ancient and early historical periods of correctional development. An overview of modern day corrections will be presented to demonstrate the full evolution of the correctional process throughout the United States.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 250 Criminal Investigation and Procedure 3

    • Introduction to criminal investigation in the field. Analysis and explanation of conduct at the crime scene, strategies for interviewing and interrogating witnesses and suspects, techniques of surveillance and preservation of evidence for presentation in court.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 310 Research Methods in Criminal Justice I 3

    • A course designed specifically for the criminal justice student, the emphasis is directed toward an introduction to research, reading and writing research reports, research design and methodology, sampling, and surveys.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 320 Research Methods in Criminal Justice II 3

    • This course completes the basic study of research methods by addressing observation, interviews, data analysis, measurements, dispersions, and introducing inferential statistics.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 310
  • CRJ 330 Criminal Law and Procedure 3

    • A study of the elements of the Penal Law particularly relevant to police officers, including a review and analysis of major criminal offenses with consideration given to the available defenses and judicial interpretations.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 490 Capstone 3

    • The culminating academic experience of the baccalaureate program. This course comprises an assignment that integrates the academic concepts of criminal justice and realities of criminal justice practice. The assignment is designed to test analytic application of critical thinking skills in working through fact-based scenarios through analysis of issues affecting contemporary practice.
      Prerequisite: successful completion of all core courses.
  • PLS 110 American Government and Politics 3

    • This course is an introduction to the processes of the American form of democratic government, the nature and structure of US government, its chief characteristics and functions. Special attention is paid to the intimate relation and mutual impact of government and the people on each other, expanding the students’ awareness of the effects of governmental decision on the American People.
  • PSY 110 Introduction to Psychology 3

    • An introduction to selected concepts, methods, and vocabulary of psychology. Focus of study will be on the individual and the conditions that influence behavior. Topics that will be covered include: growth and development, learning and thinking, emotions and motivations, personality and assessment, maladjustment and mental health, groups and social interaction, and social influence and society.
  • SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology 3

    • An analysis of the social and cultural forces that govern human behavior. The principal topics include: social interaction and organization, socialization processes, primary groups and the family (associations, bureaucracy and other social institutions), collective behavior, population and ecology.
  • SOC 330 Juvenile Delinquency 3

    • An inquiry into the causes of juvenile delinquency and the social and psychological factors involved in the predictive studies and theories concerning the development of delinquency. Topics also include formation of youth gangs, methods of coping with gang activity, the types of crime committed by children and youths, narcotics problems, neglected and retarded children, the youthful offender and wayward minor, the operation of the Children’s Court, crime prevention programs.
      Prerequisite: SOC 11
  • SOC 340 Criminological Theory 3

    • An examination of crime and theories of crime causation. Topics include: the white-collar criminal, the professional criminal, and the structure of organized crime. The criminal justice process is analyzed, including the role of the police, the criminal courts, the probation officer, correctional services and the re-entry of the offender into society.
      Prerequisites: PSY 110 and SOC 110

Science Courses (Choose 6 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • BIO 101 Humanity and the Biological Universe 3

    • This course acquaints students with basic biological, health and environmental issues of the modern world. To achieve intended awareness, students will study basic anatomy, physiology, genetics and microbiology. Special attention will be given to contemporary problems such as AIDS, genetic engineering, cancer, heart disease, and pollution. The student will use basic mathematical, computer and quantitative reasoning skills to present cohesive written summations of learning.
  • BIO 103 Nutrition 3

    • An introduction to the principles of nutrition in food management. Includes food customs, patterns and habits, nutrients in foods, applied nutrition, and world nutrition problems and programs.
  • BIO 105 Food Microbiology 3

    • A course in basic food microbiology outlining important micro-organisms, food preservation and spoilage, food contamination, enzymes produced by micro-organisms, foods in relation to disease, food sanitation, control and inspection, and microbiological laboratory methods.
  • PHY 115 Humanity and the Physical Universe 3

    • A survey course utilizing inquiry-based strategies in the physical sciences for non-science students. This course examines a broad range of topics including: Newtonian mechanics, electricity, magnetism, sound, optics, heat, energy and power, earth science including weather and climate, modern physics and the solar system. The interactions between physical science and technology and their impact on society and the quality of life will be considered.
  • PHY 120 Journey Through the Universe 3

    • Introductory and descriptive course in astronomy. Topics include: study of the universe, planetary motion, the solar system; stars and galaxies; quasars, pulsars, and black holes; possibility of extra-terrestrial life.
  • PHY 170 General Physics I 3

    • General Physics I is the study of the relationships between matter and energy in the world. In this course, students will examine Newton's laws of motion, particle kinematics and dynamics, vectors, work, energy, and momentum. Students will also conduct experiments in lab assignments to experience the science in action. Prerequisite: MAT 170.

Mathematics Courses (Choose 3 Credits)

Code Course Name Credits
  • MAT 115 Introductory Concepts of Mathematics 3

    • This course focuses on selected topics in mathematics for students of the humanities (not students pursuing math-related degrees). Students will engage in problem-solving techniques, including inductive and deductive reasoning, along with estimation to determine reasonableness of answers. Topics include: the history of numeration systems and calculating devices; logic and set theory including statements, truth tables, Venn diagrams and set operations; real number system; geometry dealing with polygons, angles, area, volume and capacity; calculating simple and compound interest, including continuous compounding. Applications to real-life situations are emphasized. Calculators and computers are used whenever they add to the understanding of the concepts. Prerequisite: satisfactory placement exam score or “C” or better in MAT 096 and MAT 100.
  • MAT 125 Finite Mathematics 3

    • Review of elementary algebra and selected topics in statistics and probability. Sets, real numbers, graphing, linear and quadratic equations and inequalities, relations and functions, solving systems of linear equations, descriptive statistics, frequency distributions, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, introduction to probability. Prerequisite: satisfactory placement exam score, MAT 100 or equivalent.
  • MAT 141 Pre-calculus 4

    • College algebra and trigonometry gives students a strong preparation for taking calculus. Topics include functions, their graphs, domain, range, inverse functions, standard algebraic transformations of functions and their corresponding geometric transformations of their graphs, exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions and their applications, addition formulas and double angle formulas. Prerequisite: satisfactory placement exam score.
  • MAT 161 Basic Applied Calculus 3

    • An introduction to calculus and its applications. Topics covered in this course include functions, limits, derivatives, tangent lines, the chain rule, maxima and minima, curve sketching, applications, anti-derivatives, fundamental theorem of calculus, integration by simple substitution and finding areas.

Concentration Courses

Forensic Investigation Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • CRJ 350 Crime Scene Investigation I 3

    • Documentation, collection, and preservation of comprehensive physical evidence; latent fingerprints, trace and biological evidence processing and collection techniques. Biohazard and other safety concerns are stressed in this course.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 351 Crime Scene Investigation II 3

    • This course provides an exploration of the potentiality of physical evidence through an examination of the wide scope of the forensic sciences. Fundamental overview of crime laboratory analytical techniques, historical development of the scientific investigation of crime, exploration of the current state of instrumentation and technology, concentration on relevancy of laboratory results to the overall investigative effort from the field investigator’s perspective. This course also covers advanced latent fingerprint development techniques.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 350
  • CRJ 352 Law Enforcement Photography 3

    • This course exposes students to the science of photography, in general, and special techniques and legal requirements in the application of photography in criminal justice contexts. This course will stress the proper use of camera, film, and light in diverse law enforcement applications such as crime scene investigations and surveillance. This course also covers legal admissibility of recorded images, including videography and digital photographs.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 353 Advanced Law Enforcement Photography 3

    • This course focuses on composition of light, specialized forensic applications, advanced low light techniques, and techniques involving reflection, absorption, and fluorescence, as well as digital image capture and processing techniques.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 352
  • CRJ 354 Death Investigation 3

    • This course focuses on the investigation of violent, sudden, unexpected, and suspicious deaths through an examination of pathologies, artifacts of decomposition, and trauma.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 355 Criminal Psychological Profiling 3

    • An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of behavioral evidence present at the crime scene; a synthesis of criminal psychology with scientific theory and methodology to combine discrete data into a more meaningful whole. Special emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of psychopathic behavior.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 250, PSY 210, PSY 310

Corrections Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • CRJ 360 Probation and Parole 3

    • An examination of organization and management in probation and parole systems. Topics include: distinctions between probation and parole in terms of organizational function and types of clients served; client relationships and interactions with other social control agencies, case loads, case work methods, and case supervision; problems in pre-sentence investigation; and job requirements and performance standards for probation and parole officers with particular emphasis on recruitment, training and assignment.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 240
  • CRJ 361 Institutional Corrections 3

    • This course provides an examination of the structure and function of the prison setting and prison operations. Particular emphasis is placed on security procedures, legal aspects, and the role of various custodial staff. In addition, the effects of the prison environment and the prison subculture upon staff and inmates are presented.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 240
  • CRJ 460 Correctional Treatment 3

    • This course provides an in-depth examination of various treatment practices within both the institutional and the community-based setting. Assessment, classification and risk prediction, the correctional counseling process, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness are all presented. This course places particular emphasis on counseling paradigms and techniques that are commonly used in correctional programs.
      Prerequisite: PSY 310
  • CRJ 461 Juvenile Corrections 3

    • This course focuses on the juvenile segment of the correctional system in the United States. The history of juvenile corrections is provided with detailed emphasis on the rationale behind the juvenile correctional process. Specific attention is given to the reformative nature of juvenile corrections. Further emphasis on modern juvenile correctional systems, classification, and treatment planning is provided. This course presents both institutional and community-based programs commonly used throughout the United States.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 240, SOC 330
  • CRJ 462 Specialized Offender Groups 3

    • This course provides a detailed investigation of the various criminal subgroups that are commonly encountered in custodial institutions and on community supervision caseloads. Sex offenders, geriatric offenders, juvenile offenders, female offenders, mentally ill offenders, and offenders with communicable diseases are addressed. These various offender typologies present unique challenges for correctional workers; students will gain an understanding of the complications that often face correctional staff and supervisors that must contend with these specialized offender groups.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 240, PSY 310
  • PSY 310 Abnormal Psychology 3

    • A study of mental health and abnormal behavior. The topics covered include: definitions of mental health and mental illness; problems of adjustment; the causes, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of mental disorders. Case studies supplement and illustrate the theoretical parts of the course material.
      Prerequisite: PSY 110

Leadership/Management of Criminal Justice Organizations Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • MGT 320 Collective Bargaining/Labor Relations 3

    • The course is designed to meet two objectives: to introduce the student to the background and relationships between economics, public policy, unionism, and business management and their impact upon management -labor relations; to provide a basic orientation to the framework, processes, and strategies involved in collective bargaining and the resolution of labor grievances and arbitration in management-labor relations. Prerequisite: MGT 315.
  • CRJ 371 Criminal Justice Leadership 3

    • This course will examine the role of management and leadership within criminal justice agencies. The course will also explore the complicated interrelationships between members of law enforcement agencies, its leadership and the communities to which they serve.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 210
  • MGT 410 Employment Law 3

    • The management of human resources takes place in a complex legal environment which places obligations and responsibilities on the employer and extends protections and rights to the employee. Federal and state requirements in EEO, employment standards, wages, job security, safety and health, workers compensation and other benefits will be covered. Integration of such requirements in day-to-day management practices is emphasized.
      Prerequisite: MGT 209
  • MGT 315 Human Resources Management 3

    • An introduction to the management of human resources for the effective support and achievement of an organization’s strategies and goals. The major functions of planning and staffing, employee development and involvement, compensation and reward and employee relations are examined. Decision-making skills in these areas are developed through class assignments. Prerequisite: MGT 201.
  • CRJ 370 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations 3

    • This course will examine the structure of criminal justice organizations including formal organizational theory, behavior and its application to the structure and methods of operation. The course will also explore the bureaucratic, political and environmental characteristics that impact criminal justice organizations.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 210
  • CRJ 384 Professional & Organizational Ethics 3

    • This course is intended to identify and clarify ethical issues associated with criminal justice organizations and professional practice. Specifically, these issues address conflicts between duty and morality, personal and professional accountability, and the philosophies of law, justice and civil rights. Practical ethics in professional life are examined.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110

Elective Courses

Criminal Justice Elective Courses

Code Course Name Credits
  • CRJ 350 Crime Scene Investigation I 3

    • Documentation, collection, and preservation of comprehensive physical evidence; latent fingerprints, trace and biological evidence processing and collection techniques. Biohazard and other safety concerns are stressed in this course.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 351 Crime Scene Investigation II 3

    • This course provides an exploration of the potentiality of physical evidence through an examination of the wide scope of the forensic sciences. Fundamental overview of crime laboratory analytical techniques, historical development of the scientific investigation of crime, exploration of the current state of instrumentation and technology, concentration on relevancy of laboratory results to the overall investigative effort from the field investigator’s perspective. This course also covers advanced latent fingerprint development techniques.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 350
  • CRJ 352 Law Enforcement Photography 3

    • This course exposes students to the science of photography, in general, and special techniques and legal requirements in the application of photography in criminal justice contexts. This course will stress the proper use of camera, film, and light in diverse law enforcement applications such as crime scene investigations and surveillance. This course also covers legal admissibility of recorded images, including videography and digital photographs.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 353 Advanced Law Enforcement Photography 3

    • This course focuses on composition of light, specialized forensic applications, advanced low light techniques, and techniques involving reflection, absorption, and fluorescence, as well as digital image capture and processing techniques.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 352
  • CRJ 354 Death Investigations 3

    • This course focuses on the investigation of violent, sudden, unexpected, and suspicious deaths through an examination of pathologies, artifacts of decomposition, and trauma.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 355 Criminal Psychological Profiling 3

    • An interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of behavioral evidence present at the crime scene; a synthesis of criminal psychology with scientific theory and methodology to combine discrete data into a more meaningful whole. Special emphasis is placed on the causes and consequences of psychopathic behavior.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 250, PSY 210, PSY 310
  • CRJ 360 Probation and Parole 3

    • An examination of organization and management in probation and parole systems. Topics include: distinctions between probation and parole in terms of organizational function and types of clients served; client relationships and interactions with other social control agencies, case loads, case work methods, and case supervision; problems in pre-sentence investigation; and job requirements and performance standards for probation and parole officers with particular emphasis on recruitment, training and assignment.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 240
  • CRJ 361 Institutional Corrections 3

    • This course provides an examination of the structure and function of the prison setting and prison operations. Particular emphasis is placed on security procedures, legal aspects, and the role of various custodial staff. In addition, the effects of the prison environment and the prison subculture upon staff and inmates are presented.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 240
  • CRJ 370 Managing Criminal Justice Organizations 3

    • This course will examine the structure of criminal justice organizations including formal organizational theory, behavior and its application to the structure and methods of operation. The course will also explore the bureaucratic, political and environmental characteristics that impact criminal justice organizations.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 210
  • CRJ 371 Criminal Justice Leadership 3

    • This course will examine the role of management and leadership within criminal justice agencies. The course will also explore the complicated interrelationships between members of law enforcement agencies, its leadership and the communities to which they serve.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 210
  • CRJ 380 Police and Community Relations 3

    • This course analyzes the complex relationship between police and community, community attitudes toward police, the efforts of the police organization to create a more favorable public image, the emergence of a civil rights and civil liberties movement, and the contribution of the individual police officer to police-community relations.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 381 Forensic Technology 3

    • An introduction to problems and techniques of scientific criminal investigation. Emphasis on value and assistance of various scientific aids to the investigator. Included are such topics as fingerprint identification, lie detector usage, hypnosis, blood typing, hair analysis, DNA typing and crime scene analysis.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 382 Patrol Function 3

    • A course devoted to an analysis of the objectives and functions of the uniformed police. Emphasis is placed on detailed examination of many typical patrol problems and consideration of both the sociological and psychological factors which facilitate or impede effective performance.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 383 Organized Crime 3

    • This course examines traditional and nontraditional organized crime groups. Topics to be covered include the role of law enforcement in investigating organized crime groups, the external relations (police, courts, prisons) within the law enforcement community as they relate to organized criminal groups. Also, the history of organized crime as it relates to the domestic and international law enforcement community will be covered.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 384 Professional & Organizational Ethics 3

    • This course is intended to identify and clarify ethical issues associated with criminal justice organizations and professional practice. Specifically, these issues address conflicts between duty and morality, personal and professional accountability, and the philosophies of law, justice and civil rights. Practical ethics in professional life are examined.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 385 Special Problems in Criminal Justice 3

    • This course will provide students with the opportunity to investigate topics within the field of criminal justice. Topics may be timely or political in nature and may cover areas as police brutality, evidence mishandling, immigration laws, police corruption, forensic abuses or any other topic relevant to an issue within the criminal justice field.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 386 Police Psychology 3

    • The focus of the course will be on the personality, character, behavioral changes and social isolation that result from the inherent high levels of stress and trauma associated with police work (from entry level to retirement). Factors such as managerial planning, supervision, specialized assignments, high hazard work, tour changes, work environments, alcoholism, substance abuse, other addictive behavior patterns, suicide, and codependent family issues will be identified and addressed.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 110, PSY 110
  • CRJ 450/550 Introduction to Fraud Examination 3

    • Financial statement fraud and occupational fraud will be studied including billing schemes, cash larceny, conflicts of interest, bribery and corruption and financial statement schemes. Upon leaving the course, students will have an understanding of how crimes are committed by an organization's management, employees and by outside parties. Students will gain an understanding of basic investigation techniques. Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 451/551 Fraud Prevention and Investigation 3

    • Students in this course will obtain an understanding of the legal requirements for fraud prevention within an organization, and will gain an understanding of policies, procedures, and internal controls intended to prevent fraudulent activity. An analysis of corporate governance will be discussed, including ethics and fraud policies and procedures, Sarbanes-Oxley fraud prevention requirements, and an analysis of accounting control systems. Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 452/552 Advanced Fraud Prevention and Investigation 3

    • Advanced study of types of fraud, documents, sources of evidence, and analysis of internal and external fraud schemes with an emphasis on the skills needed to identify and investigate fraudulent activity. Major fraud case investigation will be used with an emphasis on forensic and litigation support. Prerequisites: CRJ 250, CRJ 451
  • CRJ 453/553 Criminology and the Legal Elements of Commercial Fraud 3

    • The legal elements pertinent to investigating crime will be explored, including crime causation theories, associated punishment, and related federal laws and sentencing guidelines. The class will also include information on attorney-client privilege and the rules of evidence and testifying. Prerequisites: SOC 320, CRJ 450
  • CRJ 455/555 Interviewing and Interrogation 3

    • In this course, students will study interview and interrogation techniques commonly utilized in fraud examination to obtain evidence for an investigation. This course also includes an analysis of the types of questions asked during an interview/interrogation - including introductory, informational, assessment, closing, and admission-seeking questions - and a review of the information needed from the interview/interrogation.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • CRJ 460 Correctional Treatment 3

    • This course provides an in-depth examination of various treatment practices within both the institutional and the community-based setting. Assessment, classification and risk prediction, the correctional counseling process, and evaluation of treatment effectiveness are all presented. This course places particular emphasis on counseling paradigms and techniques that are commonly used in correctional programs.
      Prerequisite: PSY 310
  • CRJ 461 Juvenile Corrections 3

    • This course focuses on the juvenile segment of the correctional system in the United States. The history of juvenile corrections is provided with detailed emphasis on the rationale behind the juvenile correctional process. Specific attention is given to the reformative nature of juvenile corrections. Further emphasis on modern juvenile correctional systems, classification, and treatment planning is provided. This course presents both institutional and community-based programs commonly used throughout the United States.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 240, SOC 330
  • CRJ 462 Specialized Offender Groups 3

    • This course provides a detailed investigation of the various criminal subgroups that are commonly encountered in custodial institutions and on community supervision caseloads. Sex offenders, geriatric offenders, juvenile offenders, female offenders, mentally ill offenders, and offenders with communicable diseases are addressed. These various offender typologies present unique challenges for correctional workers; students will gain an understanding of the complications that often face correctional staff and supervisors that must contend with these specialized offender groups.
      Prerequisites: CRJ 240, PSY 310
  • CRJ 480 Crisis Intervention for Public Safety Personnel 3

    • Examines the concepts and techniques used by criminal justice practitioners in handling crisis situations. The focus of the course will be the development of skills to intervene effectively with specific types of crises, thereby diffusing the immediate conflict situation. Topics to be covered include: landlord/tenant disputes, family fights, suicide attempts, civil disorder and demonstrations, labor/management relations, and common crises occurring at institutional and corporate sites.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 110
  • CRJ 481 Computers and Crime 3

    • This course will examine the use of computers in the commission of crimes, the use of computers in tracking criminal activity, and computer security.
      Prerequisite: CRJ 250
  • MGT 315 Human Resources Management 3

    • An introduction to the management of human resources for the effective support and achievement of an organization’s strategies and goals. The major functions of planning and staffing, employee development and involvement, compensation and reward and employee relations are examined. Decision-making skills in these areas are developed through class assignments. Prerequisite: MGT 201.
  • MGT 320 Collective Bargaining/Labor Relations 3

    • The course is designed to meet two objectives: to introduce the student to the background and relationships between economics, public policy, unionism, and business management and their impact upon management -labor relations; to provide a basic orientation to the framework, processes, and strategies involved in collective bargaining and the resolution of labor grievances and arbitration in management-labor relations. Prerequisite: MGT 315.
  • MGT 410 Employment Law 3

    • The management of human resources takes place in a complex legal environment which places obligations and responsibilities on the employer and extends protections and rights to the employee. Federal and state requirements in EEO, employment standards, wages, job security, safety and health, workers compensation and other benefits will be covered. Integration of such requirements in day-to-day management practices is emphasized.
      Prerequisite: MGT 209
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